Hearing loss affects a lot of people; in fact 48 million Americans are currently suffering from significant hearing loss. Like most other medical conditions, catching it early means there is a better chance of better treatment. So, what should you be looking (or listening) out for?

 

1. “One at a time, please”

It’s happened to us all. Two excited people, maybe the kids, are talking to you at the same time. Most people can pick out one of the conversations and follow it, yet you find it tough to understand either one of them. In fact, women and children generally speak at a higher register so it’s hardest to hear their voices.

 

2. Being told to turn it down

Is your TV volume constantly set up to high? Do your friends and family complain that it is blasting out? The general rule of thumb here is, if you have to raise your voice to speak over the TV, it is too loud.

 

3. It’s 5pm and you’re exhausted

People don’t generally realise that straining to hear people actually uses a lot of energy. A day at the office struggling to hear the phone and trying to tune into conversations with your co-workers can leave you feeling drained.

 

4. “You think I look like a hat?!”

No, they said “you look nice in that”. Having to guess what people are saying is a daily issue for you and thinking people are saying unusual or nonsensical things is just one of those things. It doesn’t have to be.

 

5. Check the settings on your cell

 Here’s a quick test. Check what the incoming call volume on your cell is. If it is turned up to max, you could well be experiencing the first signs of hearing loss.

 

 

Do any of these signs sound familiar? If so, contact the friendly staff at North Houston Hearing Solutions. We can book you in for a hearing screening, using the very latest technology to assess potential issues with your hearing. Avoid being one of those 48 million Americans and let us help you get you on the road to great hearing health.

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Dr. Lacey Brooks, CCC-A, FAAA - Doctor of Audiology

Dr. Lacey Brooks received a bachelor’s degree in biology and chemistry in 2003, and earned her doctorate of audiology in 2009. She completed her clinical internships and residency at various facilities within Houston Medical Center. Dr. Brooks is a professional member of the American Tinnitus Association (ATA), a fellow of the American Academy of Audiology (AAA), a member of the Texas Academy of Audiology (TAA), and is certified by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). She is also the vice president of the Louisiana State University Houston Chapter Alumni Association.
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